Friday, May 28, 2010

Omnivision Earnings Call

From seeking alpha, a transcript of Ominivision's earnings call. Choice quotes:
In our later session, Bruce will discuss in greater details our leadership role in strengthening transition from a sensing to an imaging company.
[...]
As we noted last quarter, our first BSI pixel, the OmniBSI, continues to ramp in mass production with the increase accelerating rapidly as we enter our first quarter of fiscal 2011. In fact, the growth we anticipate in BSI shipments during the coming quarter is so profound that we have challenged our entire supply chain to respond. And they have. We have worked closely with each participate in each stage of production cycle to meet the quickly emerging demand for our BSI devices as we expand from simple volumes to multi-million unit shipments.
[...]
We now anticipate that we will ramp OmniBSI during the first fiscal quarter and beyond in volumes exceeding even our own expectations. In the fiscal 2010 fourth quarter, we shipped approximately 125 million units at an average selling price of $1.26. This compares with approximately 130 million units shipped in the third quarter at an average selling price of $1.18. The sequential increase in ASP during the fourth quarter reflects a favorable shift to a higher-resolution product mix.
[...]
Betsy Van Hees - Wedbush Securities Inc.
Given that you guys have done such a fantastic job in terms of your technology, as you're looking at the competitive landscape, how far is your competitive lead now above your competitors? And can you kind of give us an idea of, in terms of ranking, when they're going to be catching up to you, if at all?
Bruce Weyer
Yes, so a big portion of our technology we discussed is our pixel technology underneath the sensors. And in February, we announced our second-generation BSI pixel technology and we have been in development at BSI for almost four years now with our key technology partner, TSMC. And so first-generation BSI is ramping very significantly for us. We see significant advancements coming in our second-generation BSI-2. And just now, you're starting to see our competitors discuss BSI products for the open market in mobile phones and those areas. So we think we have a pretty substantial lead in that development.
Betsy Van Hees - Wedbush Securities Inc.
So when you look into competition though, how far does that lead stay ahead? Is anyone catching you? Or are you just going to continue to dominate the field in this area?
Bruce Weyer
So we hear of competitors starting to potentially sample products, but sampling products and meeting the performance goals of our customers could very well be different things. It does take a while to perfect these types of technologies. So I'm not in a position to fully state where they're at in their development process, but based on our sampling window to strong leadership position, we think we're in a pretty good shape.
Ray Cisneros
And just another comment about that. It's going from sampling to mass production in tens of millions of units per quarter, that's the big learning curve that everybody's got to go through. And as Bruce mentioned, it's difficult to understand where our competition is in that curve. But suffice it to say from our side, it's a learning curve that's not easy and it's not overnight.
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Yair Reiner - Oppenheimer & Co. Inc.
And then, if you could give us an update in terms of 300-millimeter transition in the future?
Bruce Weyer
300-millimeter is our base technology for our second-generation BSI-2 architectures. So we are in 300-millimeter, as we speak, and we're sampling products out of that. Typically, design cycles for our end customers take six to 12 months. So that technology will be more targeted for a 2011-type ramp in realistic volumes. And also, it's a 300-millimeter platter, so the available supply is broad upfront. So we don't see any challenges in whatsoever in ramping our 300-millimeter technology to our end customers.

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